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AAHA Day Is On July 22nd

AAHA Day is on July 22nd

This year, we celebrate AAHA (American Animal Hospital Association) Day on July 22nd!

The American Animal Hospital Association is the only organization to accredit companion animal veterinary hospitals in the US and Canada. Nearly 60 percent of pet owners believe their veterinary hospital is accredited when it is not. In actuality, only 12-15% of veterinary hospitals in the United States and Canada are accredited by AAHA. Unlike human hospitals, not all animal hospitals are required to be accredited.

What does accreditation mean? It means our hospital holds itself to a higher standard, and that your pet is receiving care at a hospital that has passed the highest standards in veterinary care. AAHA sends consultants to AAHA-accredited veterinary hospitals every three years to evaluate hospitals on their adherence to the AAHA Standards of Accreditation. AAHA consultants evaluate hospitals on approximately 900 different standards of veterinary care. These standards focus on overall veterinary care, thoroughness, safety, cleanliness and responsiveness. AAHA guidelines are professional recommendations that help veterinary teams continue to deliver quality veterinary care. AAHA guidelines cover everything from dentistry and senior care to nutrition and vaccines. Learn what these guidelines mean for you and your pet by going to: https://www.aaha.org/pet_owner/aaha_guidelines/default.aspx

AAHA also oversees The AAHA Universal Pet Microchip Lookup Tool that checks the databases of participating pet recovery services to determine which has registration information available for a microchip. Once a microchip identification number is entered into the tool, within seconds a list of all the registries with microchip registration information available, along with the registries’ contact information, will appear in chronological order; the registry with the most recent update appears first. If the microchip has not been registered with any participating pet recovery service, the result returned will default to the microchip’s manufacturer or distributor. While the tool will not return the pet owner information contained in the registries’ databases, it will identify which registries should be contacted when a lost pet is scanned and a microchip is found.

Accreditation by AAHA is the only way to know a veterinary practice is operating at the highest standards of excellence in animal care. Pet owners gain peace of mind when they choose an accredited practice, because they know their AAHA-accredited hospital has passed the highest standards of veterinary care.

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